mixing distorted guitars

Putting all those sounds together -- Plugs and processing, effects, busses, aux sends, etc.

Re: mixing distorted guitars

Postby ditto » February 19th, 2015, 10:31 pm

moontree wrote:I liked the first mix. I believe both guitars were pretty well situated in the mix. The second mix (obvious pan), is too polarizing to my ears. I am a guitar player and in general, I will lay down two tracks for every main guitar part then hard pan each to opposite sides and maybe back them off to taste. Also, the two tracks will be either different guitars or amps or both or different pickups on the guitar. This way you can dial one of the guitars up a little louder on one side and a little less pronounced on the other. Don't know if any of that makes sense?


What I've been doing more often is miking the same amp with two mics and then panning the two tracks in ways that increase the size of the guitar. But I'm finding that two mics don't really add a ton of control over the sound. Double-tracking like you do is a much better approach, I think, in terms of getting a full sound. But my problem is that I'm often doing a lot of fingerpicking these days, and I don't know if you've noticed, but with busy fingerpicking parts, it's really difficult to double-track tightly enough to make it work.

Anyway, I agree with your assessment of the second mix, and that's why I did a third mix where I pulled both guitars into the center a bit. It's a narrower soundstage but a better sound, I think.

https://soundcloud.com/yousemusic/lover-3

I changed the lyrics, too. :-)
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May I ask what a skippy is??? Michiemasha
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Re: mixing distorted guitars

Postby moontree » February 20th, 2015, 9:29 am

Sounds better with new lyrics (really like - almost Chili Pepperish) and guitars sound better. Maybe a little more even panning with clean (finger picking) guitar. A couple more things. Maybe add a little meat (low end) to the bass guitar....EQ??? and try adding a different sounding finger picking guitar to double track the one already there. You may be surprised how cool it can sound...
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Re: mixing distorted guitars

Postby Hiflier » February 20th, 2015, 5:15 pm

I have found good articles on Human hearing vs. sound placement on stereo recordings. It has a lot to do with delay of course when double tracking but it's really more than that. If sound comes to us in the real world from say more to the right-ear side we still hear a somewhat different representation of the sound source through the left ear. There is an extremely small fraction of a microsecond of delay of course but at the same time there is a slight difference in the high and low end as the sound travels around out head and nose.

I think keeping this in mind will help in panning a double track a bit closer to center on each side with some differences in not only the degree of panning but in the "0.whatever" microsecond with a roll off of the high and low EQing along with the delayed track. The technique actually makes perfect sense spatially not only in the real world but for recorded sound as well. That along with techniques added for depth and positioning sound in the mix phase becomes less of a mystery when you think about it.

BTW the project sounds great.
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Re: mixing distorted guitars

Postby Farview » February 21st, 2015, 12:32 pm

Doubling finger picking is just a matter of practice. It's a skill that has to be cultivated. When you always double your parts, you have to start place all the notes on purpose, instead of just feeling your way though it.

It sounds like you already did, but with something as sparse as this, you can do simple things to make it bigger, like a slap back delay or short reverb panned to the opposite side of the guitar just to give it width.

Putting two mics on something and panning them really doesn't do much, especially if they are the same mic. Even if you use two different mics, it would be the same thing as cloning the track and adding EQ to it. It is the difference in performance that makes the 'bigness' of a doubled track. Not only the timing difference, but there are tonal differences and dynamic differences which won't happen with a simple delay.
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Re: mixing distorted guitars

Postby ditto » February 21st, 2015, 4:13 pm

Yes, I get that now. I'm recording some fingerpicked ukelele this weekend. I'll be double miking AND double tracking. The double tracking will be for the size, the double miking will be to see if it makes a bit of difference in the end.
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Re: mixing distorted guitars

Postby Farview » February 21st, 2015, 10:43 pm

With an acoustic instrument, double micing can make a stereo image. It doesn't work with electric guitar because all the speakers sound the same. Pointing a mic behind the bridge and another where the neck meets the body will give you two different parts of the instrument and, if the mics are close enough, will give you a big stereo image.
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