Replacing Studio Monitors

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Replacing Studio Monitors

Postby Danny Vermin » April 10th, 2015, 4:32 pm

I have to replace my Roland DS90 monitors and have narrowed my search to the KRK Rokit 8 G3's and the JBL LSR308's. I make hip-hop/rap beats and will be using these monitors in an untreated medium sized room indefinitely. I use a lot of analog samples from my MPC2000 and also use digital sounds from rack mounts/keyboards and Maschine. I have all my equipment dating all the way back to the 90's and a lot of it gets used at one point or another so the sound to the speakers is going to be diverse. I don't have a sub yet and I like to have the bass sound proper as I use a lot of deep bass, 808, sine, and muddy bass that needs to be present when I'm mixing. I am looking to get the best sounding speakers for extended sessions as I can learn the nuances as I go to get a decent mix at the home studio level and then if necessary mix it down further as I see fit. I listened to both side by side at GC but it was hard for me to judge because the music selection they had was nothing like I will be playing. I could only tell that JBL seemed to have a better mid/high range than the KRK but I couldn't really tell which one would better represent the bass and what I would be sacrificing if anything for the speaker with the better bass. I'm ready to make a purchase now because I can't stand not having my monitors but the producers I know swear by the monitors they have without actually giving me any specifics. So the KRK people tell me I need the Rokits and the JBL guy I know swears they have equal the bass and way better overall sound. And one guy telling me get the Reveals. I've been doing music long enough to know it's largely personal preference when comparing gear but I was hoping someone could maybe give me some ideas based on actual use.
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Re: Replacing Studio Monitors

Postby J-Bot » April 10th, 2015, 6:28 pm

Nutshell: Go with the JBL's. KRK's speakers tend to be a little more "fun" sounding than more neutral monitors. In an untreated room, you're going to want as neutral sounding as you can get. Another reason I'd avoid the Rokit 8 G3's is that they seem to get some lackluster reviews. Another good choice would be the Yamaha HS8 8" speakers, but they're a tad more expensive.

I have an older pair of Tannoy's Reveal 6 unpowered speakers, the red colored 6" version, and I've used them for years to good effect, but I don't work with hip-hop or other club based music. I don't know which Reveals the guy was talking about, and I don't know if Tannoy's newer Reveals are better or worse than their older speakers. The Reveal 802 8" speakers might be worth looking at, though.


Regardless of what you use, getting a solid mix in an untreated room, even with decent monitors, will be like trying to hit a moving target in the dark. I would suggest checking between multiple audio sources. Good headphones, the car, your friends' stereo or boom box, maybe even on earbuds and portable devices/phones.

I would also advise to start saving up to properly treat the mixing room acoustically sooner rather than later. At the very least, treating the corners with bass traps.
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Re: Replacing Studio Monitors

Postby MASSIVE Mastering » April 11th, 2015, 1:19 am

I haven't had them here, but trusted ears I know are going nuts over those Equator 8's (don't know the exact model number). They're near stupid-cheap (well, they're under $800 a pair - And if they're half as good as "trusted ears" are telling me, they're probably worth twice that) and I'm considering getting 3-pair in here to potentially set up a surround system.
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Re: Replacing Studio Monitors

Postby cmreal04 » April 11th, 2015, 11:03 am

MASSIVE Mastering wrote:I haven't had them here, but trusted ears I know are going nuts over those Equator 8's (don't know the exact model number). They're near stupid-cheap (well, they're under $800 a pair - And if they're half as good as "trusted ears" are telling me, they're probably worth twice that) and I'm considering getting 3-pair in here to potentially set up a surround system.


I appreciate the heads up, I'm in the market right now. Looks like they're just referred to as D8's on their site.

Side note: I decided to buy a Mac mini server after your mini review/experience...has worked out great, so thanks.

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Re: Replacing Studio Monitors

Postby cmreal04 » April 11th, 2015, 11:36 am

Interesting read from the "About Us" Equator site:


Equator Audio
Founded in 2007 by Ted Keffalo. Ted has a long history in the audio industry going back decades. In 1995 he co-founded Event Electronics whose cutting edge designs ushered in the active near-field monitoring explosion. Before that he was one of the initial members of Alesis Studio Electronics. Prior to Alesis, Ted owned a recording studio, managed a music store, was a live sound engineer at the Los Angeles Coliseum, and a front of house engineer for a prominent jazz club where he did the mixing for blues and jazz greats from BB King to Art Blakey. During his collegiate years he earned money as a working musician.

Both Alesis and Event Electronics specifically developed products to aid musicians in getting professional recording results at home as well as in the studio environment. It was recognized that using accurate reference studio monitors during the recording process was paramount to achieving a great end result. Throughout many years of studio monitor development, specific details about the manufacturing process, functionality and accuracy of the monitor designs were revealed. Equator was founded to fully address all that we discovered. The cutting-edge flagship Equator Q-Series studio monitors have since found their way into mission-critical recording situations in world class studios from Abbey Road to The Record Plant to Skywalker Ranch.


What We've Learned Over The Years
No two transducers have ever been manufactured with identical output characteristics. Without the left and right speakers having the same characteristics, image shifts will occur in the stereo field. The traditional way of mounting a high frequency transducer above the woofer creates mid-range phase distortion problems. The mid-range response area of the system is absolutely the single most critical and difficult area to clear up. Traditional voicing techniques are slow, tedious and full of compromise and lead to less than stellar results. Equator has spent thousands of man-hours developing systems that address these issues. We are committed to delivering studio reference monitor solutions that overcome the myriad of challenges faced in today's production environment.

Our flagship Q-Series monitors are geared for the top of the line, high-end professional seeking a mid-field or far-field monitoring solution. They feature a real high frequency compression driver horn for extreme SPL, as well as full digital room compensation with the patented Equator Room Analysis/Secondary Reflection Correction Software Interface.

Our new Direct Field (D-Series) line of studio monitors are geared for the recording professional seeking a small, affordable, professional monitoring solution for work primarily in the direct or near field. This D-Series also features time and phase coherent Zero-Point Reference coaxial transducers and internal DSP for output matching and extensive voicing.
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